Home  |  About  |  Contact  |  Join MCACS  Donate to MCACS
Massachusetts Chapter of the American College of Surgeons Massachusetts Chapter of the American College of Surgeons Massachusetts Chapter of the American College of Surgeons Massachusetts Chapter of the American College of Surgeons Massachusetts Chapter of the American College of Surgeons
56th Annual Meeting Abstracts


Combination Stem Cell Therapy and Ventricular Restraint Therapy preserves Cardiac Function in Rodent Model of Acute Myocardial Ischemia
Suyog A. Mokashi, MD, Jian Guan, MD, Dahai Wang, MD, Vakhtang Tchantchaleishvili, MD, Ronglih Liao, PhD, Frederick Y. Chen, MD, PhD
Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA

PURPOSE OF STUDY

Heart failure is one of the fastest growing worldwide epidemics in healthcare today, with few truly successful options.  Currently, there are two broad treatment strategies for heart failure being developed-- cellular and mechanical, each holding therapeutic promise.  This study examined the hypothesis that combining two fundamentally different treatment approaches for heart failure, ventricular restraint therapy and stem cell therapy, a synergistic improvement in cardiac function will occur more than with either therapy alone.

 

METHODS USED

Using a rodent infarction model, each animal was subjected to 1 of 4 therapeutic interventions immediately following MI: control, stem cell therapy, ventricular restraint therapy and combination stem cell and ventricular restraint therapy.  Cardiac function was assessed with bi-weekly echocardiography for 6-weeks, followed by end of life analysis.

 

SUMMARY OF RESULTS

Two weeks after MI/treatment intervention, the ejection fraction (74.9% ± 5.6) and fractional shortening (48.0% ± 5.3) remained preserved from baseline in combination stem cell therapy-ventricular restraint group.  By 6-weeks the combination therapy group had an improvement in ejection fraction (69.1% ± 4.2) and fractional shortening (40.9% ± 3.6) as compared to the control group’s ejection fraction (63.7% ± 3.9) and fractional shortening (35.9% ± 3.3).  In addition, at 6-weeks the left ventricular wall thickness was greater with combination stem cell-ventricular restraint therapy (1.8 ± 0.3) as compared to stem cell therapy alone (1.4 ± 0.2).

 

CONCLUSIONS

Combining stem cell therapy with ventricular restraint therapy preserves short-term cardiac function after MI.  Furthermore, stem cell therapy should be combined with ventricular restraint therapy to provide a greater therapeutic impact on cardiac function and morphology than stem cell therapy alone.


 

 Home | About | Contact