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Massachusetts Chapter of the American College of Surgeons Massachusetts Chapter of the American College of Surgeons Massachusetts Chapter of the American College of Surgeons Massachusetts Chapter of the American College of Surgeons Massachusetts Chapter of the American College of Surgeons
56th Annual Meeting Abstracts


Does Gender Predict Responses? Teamwork and Gender in the Operating Room
Juliana E. Meyer, MD, Peter Wu, MD, Kristin Stueber, MD, FACS
Baystate Medical Center, Springfield MA

PURPOSE OF STUDY

Gender differences and inequalities are well described in the business world, and traditionally manifest themselves as lower pay, longer intervals to promotion, and less favorable perceptions for women. Our purpose was to determine whether gender differences exist in the perception of surgeons and teamwork in the operating room.

 

METHODS USED

A series of 4 standardized videos, each followed by a 15-item Likert-scale questionnaire (adapted from the OREEM), was administered to surgeons, surgical residents, operating room nurses, and surgical technicians regarding their perceptions of the surgeonís interpersonal skills and the function of the operating room staff as a team.Participant demographic information was collected such as OR role, age, gender, and number of years of experience.

 

SUMMARY OF RESULTS

A total of 112 questionnaires were administered. Overall, perception of the white female surgeonís personality and teamwork skills were more favorable than that of the white male surgeon, Hispanic female, and black male (table 1). In subgroup analysis categorized by job title, nurses perceived the black male surgeon less favorably than technicians, residents, and with a trend in surgeons (p=0.07). There was a non-statistically significant trend for participants with more than 30 years experience to score each of the surgeons more favorable than those with less experience.

 

CONCLUSIONS

The results show no surgeon gender differences however the white female video and years of experience showed a more favorable response overall. Given a larger population to sample as well as multiple facilities, we propose that there would be significant differences, as these trends suggest.

 

TABLES AND CHARTS

 

Caucasian male

Hispanic female

Black male

Caucasian female

Overall (n=58)

48.2 (46.5- 49.9)a

47.8 (46.1- 49.5)b

48.1 (46.4- 49.8)c

44.5 (42.8- 46.2)abc

JOB TITLE

 

 

 

 

Nurses (n=27)

47.2(43.9-50.6)

49.2(46.4-52.0)

51.8(49.2-54.5)123

44.5 (41.7-47.3)

Technicians (n=12)

47.5(42.7-52.3)

45.9(41.9-49.9)

45.0(41.4-49.0)1

46.0 (42.0-50.0)

Residents (n=8)

46.2(40.2-52.3)

44.4(39.4-49.5)

42.7(37.9-47.6)2

42.6 (37.5-47.7)

Surgeons (n=12)

52.0(45.8-58.2)

48.5(43.3-53.7)

46.1(41.1-51.0)3

44.3 (39.1-49.5)

Higher scores are less favorable responses. Means are reported with 95% confidence interval.

(a)    p=0.02, (b) p=0.005, (c) p=0.0001

(1)p=0.004, (2) p<0.002, (3) p=0.07


 

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